Le Nozze di Figaro

Music by

W. A. Mozart

Santa Fe Opera

Santa Fe, NM

Saturday June 29, 2013 - 8:30 PM
Friday July 5, 2013 - 8:30 PM
Wednesday July 10, 2013 - 8:30 PM
Saturday August 3, 2013 - 8:00 PM
Thursday August 8, 2013 - 8:00 PM
Tuesday August 13, 2013 - 8:00 PM
Tuesday August 20, 2013 - 8:00 PM
Friday August 23, 2013 - 8:00 PM

Cast

Figaro  Zachary Nelson
Susanna  Lisette Oropesa
Count Almaviva  Daniel Okulitch
Countess Almaviva  Susanna Phillips
Cherubino  Emily Fons
Marcellina  Susanne Mentzer
Don Basilio  Keith Jameson
Don Bartolo  Dale Travis

Conductor

John Nelson

Production

Jonathan Kent

Director

Bruce Donnell

Set Designer

Paul Brown

Costumes

Paul Brown

Lighting

Duane Schuler

About

The Marriage of Figaro is of endless appeal to audiences and scholars alike. It is psychologically insightful and politically daring, yet affirmative in its transcendent depiction of redemptive love – and filled with beautiful music. Fast-rising baritone Zachary Nelson, who riveted audiences as Angelotti in Tosca last summer, sings Figaro alongside exciting debutante Lisette Oropesa and Santa Fe favorites Susanna Phillips, Daniel Okulitch and Keith Jameson. John Nelson conducts.

Reviews

SFO spins Mozart’s magic in ‘Le nozze di Figaro’

Lisette Oropesa, who made everyone fall in love with her right from the outset in her company debut. Nothing in the evening surpassed her rendition of “Deh vieni, non tardar” in Act IV, in which she spun strands of magic in the evening air.

—  James M. Keller  •  Santa Fe New Mexican

Opera rekindles Figaro’s marriage

Lisette Oropesa, also from the Metropolitan Opera, employs her clear and appealing soprano to the myriad emotions of the complex young woman – cajoling, frustration, jealousy and ultimate satisfaction. In her touching final aria “Deh vieni non tardar (At last the moment is near)” one can almost hear her becoming tired of the subterfuge and simply wishing to be married peacefully to Figaro.

—  D.S. Crafts  •  Albuquerque Journal

Green Is Gold

His Susanna, Lisette Oropesa, makes an incandescent debut. I still can’t get her limpid, astutely phrased “Deh vieni” out of my head. That Letter Duet, “Sull’aria” with the Countess, could hardly be better sung.

—  John Stege  •  San Francisco Reporter

The Marriage of Figaro at Santa Fe Opera

I was thoroughly impressed with Lisette Oropesa's Susanna. She had great stage presence, comic flair, good timing in her stage movements, vivid chemistry with both her Figaro and Countess Almaviva, and sang beautifully this Mozart music that suits her voice so well. She sang naturally throughout the evening, with never a strained note. What a charming Susanna!

—  Luiz Gazzola  •  Opera Lively

Nature’s Power Meets Star Power in Santa Fe

Lisette Oropesa was irresistible as Susanna, burbling to and fro in a lovely voice.

—  James R. Oestreich  •  New York Times

Santa Fe Opera 2013: ‘The Marriage of Figaro’

Lisette Oropesa (who shares Madeline Kahn’s birthday) sings Susanna with sweet vibrance and spunky stage presence. I admired Oropesa in The Enchanted Island at the Met two seasons ago, and here, with superior dramatic material, she’s winning.

—  William V. Madison  •  Billevesées

A Perfect Marriage

Soprano Lisette Oropesa creates a very young, but wise beyond her years, Suzanna. She resists the usual “smartest girl in the class” smugness that many purveyors of the role affect. We see her evaluate, and then approve, the ideas as the conspirators hatch the harebrained scheme to give the Count his comeuppance. Her aria Deh Vieni, Non Tardar is exquisite.

—  Gregory Sullivan Isaacs  •  Theatre Jones

Santa Fe Opera Revives The Marriage of Figaro

Lisette Oropesa is an up-and-coming soprano who has established an excellent reputation for singing with luminous tones and precise coloratura. Her Susanna was flirty, saucy and passionate.

—  Maria Nockin  •  Opera Today

Nozze di Figaro (8/3/13)

If there was a leader in the pack, it was Lisette Oropesa, whose Susanna was a potent combination of charm and beautifully articulated wit, with telling touches of peasant common sense.

—  Simon Williams  •  Opera News