Le Nozze di Figaro

Music by

W. A. Mozart

Martin Theatre

Highland Park, IL

Friday August 15, 2014 - 7:00 PM
Sunday August 17, 2014 - 1:00 PM

Cast

Figaro  John Relyea
Susanna  Lisette Oropesa
Countess Almaviva  Soile Isokoski
Count Almaviva  Stéphane Degout
Cherubino  Renée Rapier
Marcellina  Marie McLaughlin
Don Bartolo  Kristinn Sigmundsson
Don Basilio  Rodell Rosel
Don Curzio  Benjamin Bliss
Barbarina  Simone Osborne
Antonio  Paul Corona

Conductor

James Conlon

Director

Harry Silverstein

About

Figaro is one of the best-known names in opera today, just as James Conlon is one of opera’s finest conductors. Performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro reaches lofty heights of tunefulness in the intimate setting of the Martin Theatre, the 850-seat acoustic gem of the same size as Mozartean halls. John Relyea reprises the title role he stepped into at Ravinia in 2010, with Lisette Oropesa also returning as Susanna and Soile Isokoski and Stéphane Degout portraying the Countess and Count Almaviva.

Chicago Symphony Chorus (Duain Wolfe, Director)

Reviews

Ravinia’s intimate Mozart magic remains with Conlon’s well-cast “Figaro”

The combination of his (John Relyea) big but expressive bass-baritone and her (Lisette Oropesa) lithe, silvery soprano was enchanting. Moving with the elegance of a ballerina, Oropesa flitted easily between outraged innocence and wily cynicism.

—  Wynne Delacoma  •  Chicago Classical Review

James Conlon Conducts Marriage of Figaro at Ravinia

Lisette Oropesa is a natural on stage.  Her lovely, light soprano fit Susanna perfectly.  Hers is the standard to which all opera acting should aspire.

—  Susan Hall  •  Berkshire Fine Arts

Opera Review: Ravinia’s stylish staging underscores timeless beauty of Mozart operas

His Susanna was the attractive American soprano Lisette Oropesa, who deftly captured the sparkle and intelligence of that lovely character. Oropeso is graceful beyond telling, moving like a dancer, shining in every scene.

—  Dorothy Andries  •  Mundelein Review